Luxor: Part One

Hello all! Hope you are having a lovely weekend. Here in Kuwait the weather has been sunny and mild. I’ve gotten out and about with friends, and today am going to the doctor to get the bandages on my wrist changed. I have healed perfectly, and will find out the test results this week.

On a somber note, I don’t know if you have been following the news, but Egypt isn’t looking so hot. The unrest there is tragic. When we were there, there had been protests and such, but all before we arrived. Our two weeks were over the holidays, so I think the volatility of the situation was on a bit of a hiatus. Now, though, it seems like it will be a while before things are resolved. I know I said, “Go! Visit Egypt!” in my last post, and I still think you should go. These people that are unhappy have nothing to do with the tourist industry. The tourist areas will remain stable and safe.

After we left Cairo, we went to Luxor, the main tourist city outside of the famous pyramids of Giza. We flew to Luxor from Cairo, which only took an hour. The only other way to get there is by an eleven-hour overnight train. I’ve heard good things about it, but we were short on time so opted for the flight.

When we got to Luxor, the weather was just perfect, and we walked around a bit to get our bearings.

IMG_3834Above is the main city center of Luxor. As it is right on the bank of the Nile, it was a pretty lush city with lots of palm trees and greenery. (Everybody looks pretty tired in the above picture! We sure did a lot of our vacation!)

IMG_3835Luxor temple is the most famous temple complex in the city of Luxor (along with Karnak temple). It was built in 1400 BC, and much of it remains to this day. As you can see, the city has built itself around it, with a mosque from the Middle Ages constructed literally on the side walls of the temple!

IMG_3841
We saw many, many cruise ships on the bank of the Nile. While in theory a “Nile cruise” sounds decadent, I was happy we chose not to take one. The boats stacked next to each other on the bank, the smell of gasoline, the approach  of “get off at this port and do a quick drive-by of everything in forty-five minutes” was not how I wanted to see Egypt.

IMG_3852

Instead, we chose to take a sunset cruise on a “felucca”, otherwise known as an Egyptian sailboat. We met a guy with a nice boat on the bank of the Nile, and he took us around for the evening and to watch the sunset. It was blissfully quiet and surreal!
IMG_3915

The next day we began a tour of the West Bank of Luxor. Since the sun rises in the East and sets in the West, the West Bank was where the famous mortuary temples, tombs, and celebrations of the dead took place. Our first stop was the Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut (they told us to say “hot chicken soup). The coolest thing about this temple? Queen Hatshepsut was a female pharaoh! Historically, she is known as one of the first great women in history. She reigned for over twenty years, and was known as a very peaceful pharoah. She wasn’t buried here, as this is only a mortuary temple.
IMG_3918

A column with the goddess Hathor at the top. The goddess Hathor was the god of music, beauty, love, wisdom, and dancing. My favorite goddess!

IMG_3921

Sean outside the temple of Queen Hatshepsut. If you look at these statues, they are wearing the double crown of unified Egypt. Upper Egypt is the center, bowling-ball-looking crown, and the crown of Lower Egypt is the bucket-like-crown surrounding the bowling ball. It was believed that King Menes unified Upper and Lower Egypt around 3100 BC – such a long time ago!

IMG_3926

Here we are walking into the temple of Medinet Habu. It is the mortuary temple of Ramessess II.
IMG_3929

We had a great guide, Mohammed, who interpreted the hieroglyphics  architecture, and history for us. It was fascinating! These columns are inside Medinet Habu.

IMG_3937

Can you spot Sean standing outside Medinet Habu? It was a gigantic temple complex! One of my favorite.

IMG_3946

Sean is inside one of many underground burial chambers that we explored while in Luxor. I believe this one was in the Valley of the Kings, where many of the Pharaohs and their descendants were buried. I am fascinated at how well the color has been preserved over thousands of years. If you look at the wall behind Sean, you can see the pharaoh on the far right side; you can identify him by the double-crown of unified Egypt I described above. He is making an offering to two gods, one I can only identify as the goddess Hathor (by the circle and ‘horns’ above her head). The other god may be Amun, the god of creation, only because I can see the feathers above his head, which is how he can be recognized. There is so much to interpret in each tiny etching!

IMG_3954

Sean standing at the Colossi of Memnon. They are two giant status of the Pharaoh Amenhotep. The only reason they are named “the Colossi of Memnon” is because the Greeks, in 20 BC, thought the statues were singing (or whistling) at dawn. Memnon means “Ruler of the Dawn”. The reason they were whistling though was because they had crackes in them from an earthquake. When the wind blew through the cracks, they whistled!

IMG_3955

My first time seeing a scorpion. It was a quick crawler!

IMG_3959

Our morning breakfast in Luxor. We stayed at Mara House, which really made our trip easy and fun. It was a great place!

IMG_3960

The next day we woke up to explore the temple complexes of Abydos and Dendera. Our first stop was Dendera, which is known as one of the best-preserved temple complexes in Egypt. The main god of this temple is the goddess Hathor. Each temple is generally dedicated to a particular god or goddess. Also here is where it is believed that Isis was born. Isis is the goddess of healing and magic.

The above picture is a relief of Cleopatra and her son by Julius Caesar, Caesarion. Is it one of the few known artistic representations of Cleopatra in the world. Isn’t that amazing?!

IMG_3961

Interesting hieroglyphics at Dendera.

IMG_3962

This is inside the Dendera temple complex. It is famous for it’s beautiful colors that have been preserved for so long. Can you see the goddess Hathor’s head on each column?

IMG_3963

The ceiling of Dendera. The reason this temple is so preserved is due to the draining system they had on the roof. Water couldn’t accumulate and weather the stone. The above picture represents the passage of night with the help of the goddess Nut, the goddess of the sky. Sean took an amazing panorama of this artwork,  which I will share with you in a “best of Egypt” post!

IMG_3969

Walking down into the crypts of Dendera…

IMG_3970

Hieroglyphics inside the Dendera crypt.

IMG_3971

The god Horus, wearing the crown of Egypt, and his mother, the goddess Isis.  (Do you see the helicopter above Isis’ head? Proof that the Egyptians were visited by aliens!)

IMG_3972

This is another controversial image in the crypts of Dendera. While many people believe it is a snake and a lotus flower, common in Egypt, others believe it is a lightbulb. They think the Egyptians were visited by aliens and given advanced technology, or that the Egyptians themselves had supernatural powers and created things far beyond their time. I’ll let you decide ; )

IMG_3981

Inside the temple of Dendera. If you look at the top of the columns, you will notice the goddess Hathor’s face is scratched out. In the middle ages when the Coptic Christians began to occupy these temples and use them for their own worship, they scratched out  all of Hathor’s faces as she represented sinful acts and polytheism to the Copts.

 

IMG_3985

The same wall as above, with the relief of Cleopatra and her son.
IMG_4006

Sean inside the temple of Abydos, which was the temple for the god Osiris, the god of the dead.

IMG_4013Sean liked this relief  inside the temple of Abydos, which depicts Pharaoh Seti I with Prince Rammeses (Rammeses II), roping a bull.

Overall, these two days of tours (West Bank and the day we visited Abydos and Dendera) were fascinating. We learned so much history and saw so many beautiful things. I think by the end of it though my sister was a little bit tired of eight-hours-a-day-ancient-history. Regardless, it was an unforgettable experience.

I hope to conclude Luxor in two more posts, and then, who knows? I may begin to talk about our trip to Bangkok… but that’s a tale for another time.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Egypt | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Post navigation

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: