Monthly Archives: September 2015

Building Goat Sheds In Arusha

Six things I learned about Tanzania:

  1. Swahili sounds amazing. It’s one of the happiest sounding languages I’ve ever heard. Here’s a sneak peek:
    Karibu – Welcome
    Habari gani – How are you?
    Jambo – Hello
    Kwaheri – Goodbye
    Sarafi njema – Have a good trip!
    Asante sana – Thank you very much
  2. Speaking of Swahili, the Lion King names are actually Swahili words! Remember Pumba, the warthog? Pumba means slow-witted/thoughtless in Swahili! Simba means lion. Rafiki means friend. Cool, huh?
  3. Beads are everywhere. Everything is beaded. Bracelets, earrings, bags, shoes, everything.
  4. Tsetse flies actually exist, and they’re the devil incarnate. They’re worse than horseflies, leaving giant welts that itch for days. They even carry a terrifying disease called Sleeping Sickness; if you’re bitten by an infected fly you slowly become more and more drowsy, drifting off into sleep, and then remain in a coma for the rest of your life. Thankfully it’s very rare and a nonissue for anyone considering a trip.
  5. The name “Tanzania” exists because it’s the land between Lake Tanganyika and Zanzibar island. (Put it together, Tan + Zan = Tanzania!)
  6. They take the phrase “rice and beans” to a whole new level.

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One of the great things about going with a school group was that I was able to learn about Tanzania from a more educational perspective. Normally my vacations consist of pure adventure seeking, a bit of relaxation, and a cultural day thrown in here and there. With a school group you’re always assessing the educational merit of your activities. Enter the most impacting activity we participated in: The goat shed.

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Service projects comprised much of what we did in Tanzania. The students fundraised beforehand in order to pay for the materials to build a goat shed for a local villager. The activity was facilitated by the non-profit Seeway Tanzania.

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The students had a blast and learned how to manually build a wooden structure using only a set of directions and a hammer and nails. Another important fact: The fundraising didn’t just pay for the shed itself, but for the goat that would live there. It’s a great long-term service project because the goat continues to provide for the villager’s livelihood.

It took two grueling days to build the goat shed, but I can’t wait to return again this February and see how big Hillda has grown!

Check back soon for the final installment on Tanzania, the safari!

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Jambo From Tanzania, Africa!

So, back in March Sean and I were paid to go to Africa.

Yes, it was as unexpected as it sounds.

Arusha, Tanzania to be exact. At the foot of Mount Meru, within spitting distance of Mount Kilimanjaro and the Serengeti.

The purpose of our trip was a school expedition. As the community and service coordinator for our school it is my responsibility to organize service projects for our students. Normally these projects occur around Phnom Penh, but things started to change once our school was purchased by a British organization that owns around forty different schools worldwide.  They have a property in Tanzania where students from this group of forty schools can go for a week to participate in adventure and service-learning activities.

So who better to chaperone the trip than the service coordinator and her husband?

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We flew into the town of Arusha, only an hour from the Kenyan border. The air was fresh and dry once we got off the plane; at an elevation of 4,500 feet it was drastically different than the tropical rice paddies of Phnom Penh! The first thing I noticed in Arusha were the mountains.

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Mount Meru absolutely dominated the skyline. It was impossible to lose sight of it. I talked to a few of the guides and they said that Mount Meru is actually more desirable of a climb than Kilimanjaro. For one, it’s cheaper. To climb Mount Kilimanjaro you need at least $1,000 and at least 6 days. For Mount Meru it’s only around $350 and 3 or 4 days. Secondly, Mount Meru is less crowded and you don’t need a guided tour. Lastly, you get to gaze at Mount Kilimanjaro the entire way up your hike to Mount Meru as they’re only 70 kilometers apart. Looks like I have another thing to add to my bucket list!

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While driving around Arusha I found that Cambodia isn’t the only country to disregard traffic lanes. I absolutely loved the passenger vans in Tanzania; they were emblazoned with fantastic glittering adhesive images and words. The sides were painted multiple colors in giant patterns and blocks. Some even had accent lights and high school mascot-like material covering the dashboard and inside walls.

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Another view of Mount Meru. As we were on a school trip our itinerary was completely scripted. This was nice in some regards because I could just relax and let someone else lead the show for once! Further, Sean and I only brought four students—who were complete angels—and it felt just as much a vacation as a chaperone responsibility.

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One of the days we visited Ng’iresi village which operates cultural tourism programs. Students got to learn about the lives of the Maasai tribe people.  Traditionally semi-nomadic, the Maasai have settled down in villages due to changes in land rights. You can tell this is a Maasai home because there are two round huts; one for each wife. A polygynous society, men in Maasai tribes are allowed to have more than one wife. However, a bit of research taught me that some tribes are also polyandrous, which means that a woman can have more than one husband at the same time.

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Have you ever been at your local coffee shop and seen Tanzanian peaberry brewing? Tanzania is famous for its coffee, and rightfully so. It’s delicious. These are raw beans straight from the plant.

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One thing that blew our students’ minds was the local school in the village. Coming from the elite private schools they’re used to in Cambodia, seeing three students crammed to a single desk was quite the opposite. However, our Cambodian students did notice a similarity between the government schools in Cambodia and the government schools in Tanzania. It was a great opportunity for them to unpack their privilege—even though they see poverty in Cambodia, it became more overt to them once they saw it from the perspective of another culture they weren’t accustomed to.

Thus concludes our first few days in Tanzania! Next up, we will build a goat shed, eat amazing beans and rice, and eventually make our way to Tarangire National Park… home of the elephants. Stay tuned!    

Categories: Tanzania | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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