Cambodia

How to Spend Friday Night In Phnom Penh

It’s Sunday afternoon, and I am relaxing with a steaming hot cup of tea and reflecting on the weekend. The market has been visited, the pool has been swum, the yoga has been flexed, and—like any Sunday afternoon—the laundry has been washed.

As it is the middle of October, and the rest of the world is on the pumpkin spice craze, I want to take a minute to boast a bit about Southeast Asia.

I can eat pumpkin year round. And I do.

I get pumpkin smoothies.

Pumpkin tea.

Pumpkin curry.

Pumpkin muffins.

Pumpkin pancakes.

Pumpkin egg rolls.

Pumpkin custard.

Pumpkin ice cream.

Cambodia loves pumpkin. They don’t season it with nutmeg and cinnamon, but rather treat it as a melon or gourd, which can take on a variety of complex flavors. My favorite method of pumpkin consumption is the pumpkin smoothie, and Sean’s is chicken-pumpkin egg rolls from Sesame Noodle Bar. We are on the pumpkin bandwagon as much as you are, but we are rockin’ the pumpkin craze 365 days a year.

Moving on, this weekend was pretty great. It was nothing out of the ordinary, but I made sure I brought my camera out with me so I’d have something to share with you.

But first… a picture of a Kampot sunset:

IMG_2002This was snapped last weekend as we drove down to Kampot for a short getaway. I didn’t have another blog to fit it into, so I thought it would be a nice kick-off to this one.

Anyways, Sean and I went out last night for dinner and some live music. Our friend Chino is in a band, and they’re getting pretty popular here in Phnom Penh.

I had read about a Chinese place that had good food, so we headed up Monivong to check them out.

IMG_2330The name of the restaurant is Jiang Ren Su Jia, and is near Central Market on Monivong. The place was downright CHINESE, man. Everything in there screamed China: the customers, the walls, the menu, the food, the pictures, the tea. Sean was not amused of my tourist-photography, but I had to document our visit to share with you.

IMG_2329We got in a little over our heads with food. Everything on the menu was between $2-5, so we thought the portions were going to be small. Starting by the teapot and working clockwise we have roasted eggplant with chiles, peanuts, pork and chive dumplings, sweet and sour chicken, heavenly chili oil in a saucer, and crispy spring onion pancakes.

The verdict? I loved it. Sean wouldn’t go back. So I suppose that’s 50/50, right? Which means you’ll just have to try it for yourself to find out.

After dinner we headed over to the Foreign Correspondent Club’s property, The Mansion.

The-mansionA historical gem, The Mansion is a relic from the French colonial era of Cambodia. It was built in the early 1900’s, and was a private residence for 60 years. Imagine strolling those halls in your bathrobe! When the Khmer Rouge took over, they looted the place, but left it standing and intact. It currently hosts live parties and an evening cocktail hour, but the Foreign Correspondent’s Club is looking to sell it.

Here’s another photo from the Khmer Times article about the sale1406223532If you find yourself in Phnom Penh any time soon, you absolutely have to visit. Who knows what the future of this building may be, but for now, it’s a piece of living history.
Our friend’s band, Bacano, is a Latin Rock band here in Phnom Penh. Check out an article on them here, and here’s their Facebook page. In case you’re wondering, the word bacano is a Colombian term for something very good, cool, or nice.

IMG_2336Here’s a few shots of them from last night at The Mansion. Normally the bands play outside, but there torrential rain so they moved the event into the dark and mysterious cavern of The Mansion itself.
IMG_2338They’ve got an amazing mix of culture in their band. Starting from left to right, the guitarist is Russian/Chilean/Swedish, the bassist is Cambodian, the singer/guitarist is Colombian, the female drummer is Filipino, and the guy on the djembe is Pakistani.

IMG_2344Everybody was rocking out by the end of the night.

So, there you have it. A typical weekend evening in Phnom Penh. Good food, good company, good music.

 

Advertisements
Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Dumpling Street: The Legend of the Penh


 

The dumpling.

A warm, steaming ball of glutinous goodness. A crispy, flaky packet of love. Globally, there are as many styles of dumpling as there are version of “Insert Country Name” Idol. (No, really. Look how many countries have their own Idol show.)

America has chicken  and dumplings. Italy has ravioli. India has the samosa. Poland has the pierogi. Japan has gyoza. Crab rangoons. Gnocchi. It’s hard to find a cuisine that DOESN’T have a dumpling.

In Cambodia, one street that has become something of a legend when it comes to all things dumpling. Street 136, adjacent to the bus stop near Central Market, has been serving up the most delicious dumplings I have found in the city yet.

But maybe that’s only because there are five dumpling restaurants in a row. Five. How could one go out for dumplings and stop after just one?

Enter the dumpling crawl.

I first heard of the dumpling crawl on Move To Cambodia’s site a few months ago. Since then I have been itching to head to street 136 and try things out for myself.

IMG_1861Our first stop was Feng Yuan Restaurant, closest to Central Market on 136. If you couldn’t guess, everything was in Chinese the second we walked in the door. Even the staff spoke Chinese before Khmer, it took a few minutes of pantomiming to clarify our order!

 

IMG_1860I knew we were in for a treat when I saw heavily-used steaming baskets  outside the entrance.

 

IMG_1862Not only that, but seaweed swaying in the breeze! On a drying rack, as if it were laundry, they were drying kelp. My friends Jeff and Lily were great models for all my photos. (How much Chinese can you see behind the seaweed? See what I mean?)

 

IMG_1859It wasn’t hard to warm up to the idea of the dumpling crawl. Restaurant #1 had us off to a great start.

 

IMG_1863As we moved onto the next restaurant, we found a very confusing poster. The thing is, I don’t know it is yelling at me, or if it is giving me wisdom?

 

IMG_1864I’m not so sure about the “Mind no evil” monkey…

 

IMG_1865Regardless of their ambiguous poster, this place had by far and away, the best dumplings. Totally crispy, flavorful, and succulent.

 

IMG_1867

Restaurant #3’s dumplings were a bit of a disappointment. The bright side was that they had an entire cup of minced garlic for us to drown our tasteless bites in. Not only that, but each of these places had out-of-this-world chili oil. I don’t know if this is how the oil is made here in Cambodia, but this website has pretty nice photos of the possible process.

 

 

IMG_1868Now, restaurant #4, on the other hand, had it’s own unique theme going on. Not only were their dumplings pretty top notch, but they had a complementary picked vegetable platter in addition to the chili oil, minced garlic, and hot peppers. Their dumplings weren’t have bad either.

 

IMG_1869By the end of our dumpling crawl, we had feasted at four different restaurants, learned a lot about the dumpling culture in Phnom Penh, and played lots and lots of cards.

The worst part? Now, I can’t stop dreaming about dumplings. I thirst for them almost as badly as I do for coffee in the morning. I seek out any opportunity to overwhelm my tastebuds with dumpling goodness.

The moral of the story: Dumplings are a slippery slope of indulgence. Eat with caution. Or, throw off the bowlines and drown yourself on street 136.

 

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Rip Van Thailand

We’re back with another blockbuster video from the swaying palms of Southeast Asia. Sean has seamlessly spliced and sewn together snippets of our Khmer New Year holiday to Koh Kut, and we present them to you today. It’s a bit old, thus the title Rip Van Thailand, but a tale is just as great centuries later. Ask the Romans.

A quick refresher on where we went:
Screen Shot 2014-09-17 at 7.28.52 PMWe drove from Phnom Penh to the Thai border, then took a boat to Koh Kood(Kut). I marked Ho Chi Minh and Bangkok’s general area to give you a scope of where we were.

IMG_1403

We had a leisurely trip to the border, with lots of rest and play along the way. Here we are kicking back at Nomad’s Land on Koh Totang. It was the peak of the hot season, so we moved very slowly and swam as often as possible.

 

Once we crossed the Thai border, we took a two hour boat ride to Koh Kut. IMG_1404Stepping onto the pier, I realized where the dried shrimp in our spring rolls come from.
IMG_1406I never dreamed there were so many shrimp hanging out where I snorkel!

 

Then, we had five days of bliss. I couldn’t get enough of Koh Kut. I daresay I liked it more than Koh Chang. But it’s tough when you’re comparing paradise with Shangri-La.

Here’s the video. Be sure to watch it in the highest resolution you can. We shot it in 1080p:

 

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Cambodian BBQ & Window Fishing

Hello loyal readers! Happy September! Things are full swing here in Cambodia; rain has begun to fall steadily from the sky, students file in and out of classrooms, and I continue to add too many chilies to my cooking. (No joke—Cambodia’s bird’s eye chillies are the spiciest things on the planet. I can’t even touch one without breaking into a sweat for hours afterward.)

 

In my free time I’ve managed to get around the city a bit and have a good time. Last week I met up with my friends for trivia night at The Willow. Beforehand we had dinner at Sovanna 2, a Cambodian BBQ joint across from the trivia bar.

IMG_8765Your typical Cambodian meal will have a cooler full of ice next to your table, extra soda, water, or beer that you help yourself to, and a trash bin on the floor for you to discard your napkins or chicken bones into.

IMG_8766We had quite the spread. Fried rice, sautéed morning glory, grilled squid, it was delicious.

On another note, I wanted to share a great blog with you that I recently discovered. My friend Jared—also a Madisonian at heart—has lived in Cambodia for quite a few years now. He was having dinner with us at Sovanna 2, and he told me that he lost a package of Johnsonville brats. Now, as you know, Johnsonville brats are one step away from divine holiness for a Wisconsinite. Luckily, they can be bought here in Cambodia (which is Sean’s favorite weeknight meal, second only to a fast food burger from Lucky Burger…).

Anyway, Jared went on to tell me how his package of brats went missing, and, well, you’ll have to read the rest.

Check out his blog, and the story, here: http://www.jaredscambodia.com/blog/2014/09/cambodian-window-fishing/ 

 

I’ll be back soon, with more photos and stories about Cambodia! 

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Thunderstorms in Cambodia

Cambodians are incredibly afraid of being struck by lightning. I used to think nothing of it, until this afternoon.

There was a torrential rainstorm, and the streets flooded up to the wheel-wells of the cars.

The temperature dropped a few degrees, and the wind started blowing.

This is all good and normal, even so far as the lightning. We are used to hearing thunder rip through the sky after a brilliant flash of white, but now that we’ve moved up to the seventh floor, we’ve taken on a entirely new perspective.

Check out a quick video I took when we got home from school. 

Can you spy…

…the cars and motos creating wakes of water in the street?
…how ridiculously long the thunder lasts for?
…the great view out our bedroom window?

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Tuk Tuk Monopoly In Phnom Penh

You had to read that title twice, didn’t you? It is almost like trying to speak a different language. Catching a tuk tuk in Phnom Penh, okay, that makes sense. But Monopoly? Let me slow down.

 

First, you must remember that this is a tuk tuk:

Cambodian_tuk_tuk

Second, you must remember that this is Phnom Penh:

map

 

Third, if you have never played Monopoly…

monopoly

 

 

Now, let’s get started. As a staff ice-breaker and introduction to the city for new teachers, our school held a “tuk tuk Monopoly” race throughout Phnom Penh. We were given a game board, and instead of “Park Place” or “Boardwalk”, we had “Wat Phnom” and “Malis Restaurant”. The team who visited the most locations and racked up the highest points was the winner.

Never one to refuse a challenge, I met with my team at the start time, and we worked with our tuk tuk driver to map out a route of the city.

Our driver was amazing. The best driver I have ever had in Cambodia.

I’m not kidding.

When I first moved here, and had no idea where anything was, I would tell a tuk tuk driver, “Bouchon wine bar, please. Do you know where it is?” And he would politely nod, yes, of course. Then, thirty minutes later, I would be outside the number one night club in Phnom Penh, Pontoon.  I quickly learned that the tuk tuks know every single Wat and pagoda, but if you ask them about some swanky, foreign gastropub, obviously they’re gonna draw a blank. So, I learned to speak Khmer, mapped out the pagodas in my head, and have no more problems.

But this tuk tuk driver, he was in another league.

This guy knew every street, every bar, every cafe, every landmark. And he mapped out our route for us, in complete perfection.

I would mention three or four places we needed to go, and he would say, “Well, first let’s go to the riverside, because we can hit three of those places in order. Then, we’ll head over to the place you mentioned, and then down to the final stop. What else is on the gameboard? Oh, Sorya Mall? We can put that second. But if you want to get a picture of Raffles hotel then we need to go there before we go down to Central Market.”

The best part? His name is Bond. Jame Bond.

Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 5.42.46 PM

 

I took one of his cards before he left. With his photo on the back, he makes sure you never forget his name or his face. This guy, he was legendary. If you are ever in Cambodia, do yourself a favor and call Jame Bond.

So, as I was saying, we—and by we, I mean Jame—mapped out our route, jumped onto the tuk tuk, and sped off down the congested streets in quest of first place.

Screen Shot 2014-08-24 at 4.50.16 PM

We had around three hours to check off as many places as possible.  I mapped our journey for you to get a better picture of where we went. I mean, just look at that route! Absolutely no back-tracking, no unnecessary streets, just seamless travel. If you ask me, Mr. Bond should become an urban planner.

0Our team. Meli, next to me, teaches Language Support in the Primary School. Mark, in the blue, is a grade 6 teacher. John, in the white, is our Secondary school guidance counselor. (And is from Wisconsin!) Jame, in the light blue, is navigating the streets. We had a dream team, let me tell you!

1The rule of the game was that we had to get a picture of ourselves in front of each location, with some sort of sign labeling the place. Our first stop, as you can see, is Russian Market. (Toul Tom Poung market, in Khmer.)

 

2

Then we headed over to the newest place in Phnom Penh, Aeon mall. (You can start to see a theme of the photos… from here on out it’s all shots of us standing in front of something.)

3Then, to Malis, a famous Khmer restaurant.

4Metahouse, a popular place to see foreign films. Jame took all of our photos—pretty soon we got into a fluid routine of jumping out of the tuk tuk, snapping the photo, and racing back in.

5One of the “bonus” activities, to win extra points, was to get a photo with a monk. With the help of Jame, that was no problem.

 

6

 

Then it was off to the National Museum.


7

And one of the most famous expat places in Phnom Penh, the Foreign Correspondents Club. The most legendary bar in Phnom Penh, you can read the scandalous backstory of the place here.

 

 

 

8

Wat Ounalom.

 

 

 

9The token Irish pub of Cambodia, Paddy Rice. (Where we ran into a teacher from another team who had long given up hope at winning tuk tuk Monopoly. He should have joined Jame Bond.)

 

 

10

A brief stop over at Artisan’s Angkor, a social business where local artists sell their work.

 

 

11Wat Phnom! My favorite wat (temple) in the city.

 

12Doors, known for their live music and great brunch. (Doesn’t this photo look like an album cover?!)
13Funny story about this photo. This is the Elephant Bar at the Raffles Hotel. We were terrified to go inside because there was a rumored “policeman” somewhere in the city for the Monopoly game. (Remember when you played the game and got sent to jail?) If we were caught by the policeman, we had to head straight back to Northbridge, a thirty minute ride, get a signed form, and then head back into the city. So we snapped a quick picture and left as fast as possible!

14

Central Market.

15

Sorya shopping center, near Central Market. They’ve got a nice food court on their top level, most memorable for me when I dumped a 16 ounce avocado smoothie down the front of my shirt.

 

16The French cultural center.
17Deco, which has fantastic microbrew beer on tap from Cervisia brewery, an up-and-coming brewery here in Phnom Penh.

18Tabitha foundation. One of the more famous NGO’s, which has built Nokor Tep hospital, a free hospital for women in Cambodia.

And then, the finish line! We rolled in with five minutes to spare. And guess what? Thanks to our diverse team knowledge and Jame Bond’s skills, we actually came in first place!  We earned the most points by means of visiting the most places, getting the most bonus shots, and all showing up in a fancy dress. (I left that photo out though, for the integrity of my lovely coworkers.)

The bottom line? Next time you’re in Cambodia, use this map as a guide for all things local, and call Jame Bond.

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Sweet Tooth

A quick post on a busy Saturday morning. Sean and I are moving into another apartment and settling into the routine at school, so we’ve got lessons to plan and boxes to pack. Did I mention how much I love being back in Cambodia? I love it. It feels so good! So much like home. 

I saw this advertisement online for a dessert at a popular restaurant here, and I had to share it with you. I am good at photographing a lot of what I eat, but I have never really talked about Cambodian desserts. 

Take a look at your typical Cambodian sweet snack:

Artease DessertEven if I did photograph that myself, I could never have identified all the gelatinous bubbles that exist in one bowl. In the year that we’ve been here, I have decided that I do like coconut jelly, and I certainly like fresh mango. The chewy pearl, grass jelly, aloe vera, and earl grey tea jelly, though, I have yet to form an opinion on. 

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , | 4 Comments

Saturday At Central Market

I have a confession.

I may pride myself on the upkeep of Angkor’s Away, but I actually have  a silent partner. I write the words, I frame the posts, I generate the ideas… but I take none of the photos.

You can pretty much count on Sean as the photographer for Angkor’s Away. Almost all of the time. Without him, this blog would be imageless stories.

Now that you have some background, I can tell you a story. Since we got the GoPro, we have barely taken any pictures. The GoPro captures such amazing video footage, that I bring it everywhere. It’s a weird transition—I used to carry a camera and snap photos as we went about our day. But with the GoPro, you turn it on, hold it in your hand, and pretty much forget about it. Then, we look back through the footage and take screen shots of the pictures we like the most.

We just finished up our first school year here in Cambodia. We have officially lived in Phnom Penh for eleven months. So, the weekend before we left, I headed up to Central Market, with the goal to take some photos of my own.

DCIM101GOPROThe corner of Central Market. A cyclo driver cleaning his carriage, getting ready for a busy day.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.24.44 AMThe alleys near Central Market.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.23.20 AMA family ready to sit down to breakfast, and a woman going about her daily business.

DCIM101GOPROCentral Market. It was built in 1937, and was said to be the “largest market in Asia” at the time. It was designed in Art Deco style by French artist Louis Chauchon.

 

DCIM101GOPROOranges for sale. Our oranges are green here, but they still taste just as good!

 

DCIM101GOPROSkewers of __________, frying in oil, ready for sale.

 

DCIM101GOPROThese ladies were really cute. They were selling fresh honeycomb! Some even still had bees sitting on them. They didn’t want me to take their picture, they wanted me to buy their honey.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.18.50 AMA popular walk-way along Central Market.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.19.45 AMMangos, mangos, everywhere!

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.22.53 AMThe main dome of Central Market. Jewelry, sunglasses, and watches are in the central dome. It has a really cool feel.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.25.44 AMDid I say we have a lot of mangos in Cambodia?

 

DCIM101GOPROAfter Central Market, I stopped by one of my favorite smoothie ladies on my way home. On the corner by the National Museum, “Davy’s Shake Shack” whips up some of the most delicious fruit smoothies I have had in a while. My favorite is passion fruit, mango, coconut.

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.16.57 AMAnd so I sat with my smoothie and took in the view. What a great way to end a trip to the hustling and bustling Central Market.

 

And that’s it! Year #1 in Cambodia is finished! I didn’t want to say this, but I am actually sitting in Seoul Airport as I type this. The year is really over. But, don’t worry, this is still so much to see! I have another amazing video to show you from our explorations in Thailand, and there is also the undiscovered wilds of Wisconsin… and probably some photos of cheese curds and good beer. If it isn’t consumed too quickly.

 

Check back soon!

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Graffiti In Phnom Penh

Street art says a lot about a place. Whether it is the fact that it is rampant, absent, honored, or scorned, people always seem to have an opinion on street art and its place in their home.

Phnom Penh has a surprisingly vibrant street art scene. In my grade 9 English class, we were studying controversy, and our central question was, “Graffiti: Vandalism, Art, or Both?” I teamed up with my friend Anna who is the high school Art teacher, and together we planned a field trip to seek out the graffiti around Phnom Penh.

If you live here in the city, check out the Facebook group, Graffiti Cambodia. They’re always posting new places, even with a bit of info about the artists themselves.

However, Anna and I scoured the internet and never found a comprehensive map of where to go.

So we made one ourselves:
MapI numbered the sites we visited 1-7, in the order that we visited them. The pins without a number do have graffiti, but we didn’t visit those on the trip. If you’re familiar with the city, you can see that we started near the intersection of Monireth and 271, then headed down 271, came up Norodom, drove past ISPP, headed in BKK below Sihanouk, went up Monivong, and made a final stop near Bong Kak Lake. Got it? Good.

Now let’s look at some art. (All photos compliments of the lovely and artistic Anna Sudra.)

DSCN0444STOP #1
Street 430 off Monireth.

 
DSCN0453STOP #2
Continue straight along street 430. Near Phnom Penh Sports Club.

 

DSCN0459STOP #3
The motherload of graffiti. A giant open space with at least five pieces by various artists. A vacant lot across from the Malaysian Embassy on Norodom.

 

 

DSCN0461STOP #3 Continued

 
DSCN0466STOP #3 Continued

 
DSCN0469STOP #3 Continued

 

 

DSCN0475STOP #3 Continued

 

 

DSCN0477STOP #4
An alleyway behind ISPP on Norodom. This is actually a series of pieces of the “boy with the butterfly”. It tells a story the whole length of the alley wall.

 

 

DSCN0484STOP #5
The side of a restaurant and bar, across from Top Banana Guesthouse. There is a whole montage of faces on the second level. Really beautiful.

 

 

DSCN0488STOP #6
Street 184. Inside Puthisastra University. A compilation by multiple artists: Peap Tarr and Lisa Mam to be sure, along with others I can’t remember.

 
DSCN0490STOP #6 Continued

 
DSCN0494STOP #7
All the way up near the Bong Kak Lake area. From Monivong, turn left on street 80 before the Start Chas Roundabout. You will be driving alongside the French Embassy on your right. You will then find a giant cache of street art sprouting along the buildings.

 

 

DSCN0495STOP #7 – Continued

 

 

DSCN0496STOP #7 – Continued

 

 

DSCN0497STOP #7 – Continued

 

 

DSCN0499STOP #7 – Continued

 
DSCN0501STOP #7 – Continued

 
DSCN0502STOP #7 – Continued

 
DSCN0503STOP #7 – Continued

 
DSCN0506STOP #7 – Continued

 
DSCN0509STOP #7 – Continued

 

And before we knew it, it was 3pm and we had to be back at school. What a fantastic day… full of unexpected surprises. I added it to my mental list of the thousands of reasons why I love Cambodia.

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Road Tripping The Cambodian Coast

It was the spring break that wasn’t.

 

Moving abroad, you shed some of the terminology that you used so mindlessly back home.
For us Americans, college became university.
America became The States.
Vacation became holiday.
Bubbler became water fountain. (For me, at least.)
First floor became ground floor.
And, obviously, soccer became football.

Anyways, calling it spring break means nothing when you don’t teach at an American school. In Cambodia, the second week of April celebrates Khmer New Year, which is when we have our week-long break. Khmer New Year coincides with Songkran in Laos and Thailand, Thingyan New Year in Burma, as well as Sinhalese New Year in Sri Lanka. Clearly, calling it anything BUT a “New Year’s break” would get you strange looks in most of Southeast Asia.

I was lucky enough to have my parents visiting, and we took a gorgeous road trip along the Cambodian coast. We spent a few days exploring the wild, pristine landscape of our country before heading into Thailand and visiting Koh Kood.

Also important to note, today marks a significant change in the format of Angkor’s Away (AlohaKuwait for you veteran readers). Sean and I purchased a GoPro. Instead of snapping hundreds of photos, we are now shooting high-quality video in 1080p.

And now you will come to be familiar with one of Sean’s favorite hobbies: video-making. Here is our first GoPro compilation from our trip along the Cambodian Coast. We drove down through Bokor National Park to a teeny tiny island near Koh Sdach, which is the home of the best lodging in Cambodia: Nomad’s Land. It is in an absolutely stunning–and absolutely isolated—archipelago between Sihanoukville and Koh Kong. It is the most beautiful place in Cambodia that I have seen yet.

Then we hopped over to Koh Kong for a lovely paddle down the river, dined on fresh shrimp, and frolicked on the beach as the sun set. Take a look:

I recommend watching it on the highest resolution possible; the snorkeling footage is fantastic.

Beautiful, isn’t it? After our few days in Cambodia, we crossed the border to Thailand. But that’s another video. See you soon!

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.