Posts Tagged With: injera

Top Ten Travel Highlights of 2013

Happy New Year! I can’t believe it’s 2014 already. Since we’ve moved abroad, Sean and I have rang in the new year in Jordan, Egypt, and now Cambodia. As amazing as it is to keep looking forward to new adventures, it is equally important to reflect on all we’ve experienced. 2013 was pretty awesome. We moved from Kuwait to Cambodia. We celebrated our second year of marriage. Sean had knee surgery. I had wrist surgery. Sean tried pufferfish. I started eating chicken again. We watched Breaking Bad. But I digress.

Anyways, here are our travel highlights of 2013. There’s not really any particular order; it was near impossible to prioritize such perfect memories…  I hope you enjoy!

 2013 Travel Highlights

10. Playing disc golf with my family over the summer (Wisconsin)547901_4009921418603_1670924733_n

 

9. My last vegetarian thali at Banana Leaf (Kuwait)img_2404

 

8. Climbing Kep Mountain (Cambodia)10

 

7. Learning to speak Khmer (Cambodia)1185019_10201246178628688_1713916646_n

 

6. Eating giant prawns on the Koh Kong coast (Cambodia)img_6725

 

5. Becoming addicted to shiro and injera (Ethiopia)img_4913

 

4. Smoking shisha with my mother and the head of the Ministry of Communication (Kuwait)img_4726_2

 

3. Hiking five nights on The Beaten Path trail (Montana)15

 

2. Petting baboons in the Simien Mountains (Ethiopia)img_5656

 

1. Standing under the raging waterfall of Tad Yeang—Can you spot me? (Laos)img_7795-version-2

 

 

 

Advertisements
Categories: America, Cambodia, Ethiopia, Kuwait, Laos | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Two Weeks In Kuwait Through My Eyes

Happy May everyone! And by May, I mean one way away from June. I can’t believe how fast this year has flown by. That sounds cliche, I know, but within this month, I am no longer a second-year teacher and Sean and I will have been married two years now. How mind-blowing is that! I feel like it was just a few months ago that I was walking down the grassy green alter on our wedding day, and when I was nervously preparing lesson plans for my “first day” of school.

What do you learn in two years? Would you consider me a different person? Sean is twenty-five and and I am twenty-four. Are we more mature than our college selves? I think we live a less spartan lifestyle, and we laugh when we say things like, “in this household”, realizing that we ARE a household, a family. The two of us.

Regardless, do I know where I’m going and what the next two years will hold? Absolutely not. And I hope I can never say that I do.

Anyways, this blog post is to catch you up on this month in Kuwait. May was a fun month of exploring, dining out, and celebrating the end of the school year. As of right now, we have next week of final exams, then school is over. Sean and I fly out of Kuwait June 9th for Chicago. That means I have to get as much Kuwait culture in as possible, and I’ve been pretty good at it.

IMG_5794Abby, Wyn and I went to the Ethiopian restaurant in Kuwait. Well, we’ve been going and will continue to go, once a week for the past month. I don’t know if you picked up on it, but Abby and I were absolutely obsessed with Ethiopian food! It is a vegetarian’s dream. Everyone had mentioned that there was an Ethiopian restaurant in Kuwait, and when we got back from Ethiopia I tracked it down the same week. Their food was fantastic, and they are so nice. It is a totally “feel good” place, with the Ethiopian colors painted on the walls, and the smell of spices, coffee, and frankensense in the air. Everyone in there was Ethiopian, and it felt like we were back in Addis Ababa.

IMG_5795This is my favorite dish, beyaynetu. It is a mix of vegetarian items that you eat with the fluffy sour bread, injera. No forks needed, you just scoop it up with the injera! The stuffed spicy pepper is my favorite.

If you live in Kuwait and are looking for this place, it’s called Al Habesha Ethiopian Restaurant.

Picture 1It’s in Hawally, near the Universal American School. I take the bus to get there, the #66, and get off at the mosque roundabout (in the upper right-hand corner of this map). Then I walk down Ibn Khaldoun street. Stay on the left side of the street, you’ll pass a McDonald’s, then a Sears, then a Subway (sounds like America, doesn’t it!?) which is part of a nicer looking mall called Zawya Complex.

Picture 2Here’s another, closer view. Notice that the restaurant is BEHIND the Zawya Complex (it has also been called Al Bassam Complex #3). When you get to the Subway, you need to wrap around the back of the building, and the restaurant is on the backside. There is actually a row of cool Ethiopian shops all in a row there! It’s now one of my favorite hidden gems of Kuwait.

IMG_5796Here we are waiting to board the bus home from Al Habesha.

Al Habesha delivers, too! Abby and I were really tired on Wednesday and had student-led conferences at 5:30, so we decided to have them deliver. Their delivery numbers are 6633 9296 or 6048 4303. I highly recommend it!

IMG_5785You can even buy their injera to go, so I ordered 10 pieces. (It’s only 1 KD for 10!) I learned how to make shiro (a chickpea flour and tomato puree), so now I order injera from Al Habesha and feast on my own shiro. Life is good! I will miss this when I leave Kuwait!

IMG_5932Since this post is a week through my eyes, I wanted to mention how much I love Zumba in Kuwait. It keeps me sane since there’s not a lot of outdoor recreation possibilities here. Sharon (on the left) has been my instructor for two years, and Nicole (on the left) just got her instructor’s license last summer, and teaches lessons from time to time. I love dancing with them! Sharon is leaving this year and moving to Mozambique, and Nicole is taking over instruction next year. She teaches at AIS, where the classes will be held. If you’re looking for great Zumba in Kuwait, I highly recommend dancing with these ladies!

IMG_5916I brought my camera to school one day, and wanted to snap a few photos before the year finishes and we head for home. This is a “hall way” near Sean’s classroom. Everything is open air, and has a really peaceful feeling. I’m going to miss it.

IMG_5918

Sean getting down to business in his classroom. He just screams fun humanities teacher, doesn’t he?

IMG_5919Sean’s classroom. He is such a great teacher. I love the visuals, the color, the student work. He inspires me.

IMG_5885

Time for another food adventure! Abby and I went to the Sri Lankan restaurant in Kuwait City. I love, love, LOVE Sri Lankan food, and ate at this place when my mom visited. It is really spicy, but a fun chance to mix it up when you get tired of hummus and flat bread.

IMG_5886

These are traditional Sri Lankan “snacks”, which you can eat on-the-go. When you sit down to eat in Sri Lanka, these are placed in heaping mounds on your table, and you eat your fill of whatever kinds you want, then you pay whatever you owe. They’re filled with all sorts of curries in the center. Curried hard boiled egg, curried potatoes, they’re delicious!IMG_5891

These are string hoppers in the back, and then I swear the front item is a shredded, seasoned coconut, but Abby disagreed. Post in the comments if you know what it is! Regardless, you eat it all with your fingers. Nom nom nom.

IMG_5889

I never understood why the restaurant was called the “Chandra Hotel”. But I like that they have a clear price list posted. I want to go back and try even more things.

IMG_5893

A meal is not complete with a spot of tea after wards. In all the countries I’ve been to in the Middle East, this is the typical way most people drink tea. They add cream (or condensed milk) to it, then you add sugar as you see fit. It’s delicious!

IMG_5882

A stormy afternoon in Kuwait. It’s not often that you see dark clouds in the sky, or swirling ones for that matter! Unfortunately they only provided a few sprinkles, not a torrential downpour like I dreamed.

IMG_5980

My last “adventure” of the past two weeks was when Sean and I took a trip to one of our favorite restaurants in Kuwait, Sabaidee Thai. It’s in Medan Hawally (or Salmiya?) and it’s a really well-priced Thai place with good food.

IMG_5981

Sean ordered sweet and sour chicken and I got shrimp panang curry. We had two sides of rice and two sodas for a total of 5 KD, which is really a great deal for good food and a nice atmosphere in Kuwait. We walk there, which makes for a very pleasant stroll. Sabaidee is actually marked on Google Maps, so look it up if you’re interested in visiting.

Well, there you have it. Two weeks in Kuwait. Do you think food is a central element to recreation here? I hope that changes when I move to Cambodia. As much as I consider myself a foodie, I want to develop hobbies that don’t involve visiting restaurants and taking pictures of food. On the flip side, when people talk to me about my blog, they say they love looking at all the cool restaurants I visit and foods I eat. I can’t wait to share the foods of Southeast Asia with you! The more people I tell about Cambodia, the more they gush about how much Sean and I will love it. We are toying with the idea of purchasing a car and, dare I say it in writing, a dog. It would be my dream to have a dog and a car, so as to travel around Cambodia for swimming in the waterfalls, canoeing, bicycling, weekend trips, island hopping (well, that would be without the car), all with a doggy. I want a dog so bad, it’s not even funny. However, it’s really difficult to have a traveling lifestyle when you’ve got a pet, so we have some decision to make in the near future. In Cambodia, the possibilities are endless!

I hope to post at least once more before we leave Kuwait. I will continue to carry my camera around with me. Post in the comments if there is a particular thing/activity/event/place/item you are interested in my blogging about, and I will make an effort to do so before we leave Kuwait!

Categories: Kuwait | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments

Ethiopia: Two UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Two Days.

When most people think of Ethiopia, I would bet my herd of camels they don’t imagine 16th century castles. On the second day of our journey, we visited Gondar, nicknamed the “Camelot of Africa”. The Solomonic Emperors of the 16th century began to settle in the Lake Tana region of Ethiopia, and in 1636 Emporer Fasilidas founded the city of Gondar.

Wait a minute, Kim, you’re saying. Solomon kings? I’m confused, you’re saying. Also, why was your last post titled, “Iron Like A Lion In Zion”? What’s with all these references? You were in Africa, right? What’s the connection?

I need to clear the air on this whole Solomon/Zion thing, so you can fathom how rich Ethiopia’s history truly is. The Solomonic dynasty are the Ethiopian kings beginning from 950 BC who believe they are descendants of King Solomon of Israel and the Queen of Sheba. King Menelik I was their son, who was one of the first rulers of Ethiopia. On the Ethiopian flag there used to be the Lion of Judah as Solomon was of the tribe of Judah. Therefore, the Ethiopian emperors were descendants of this tribe. This line of emperors continued all the way until Emperor Haile Selassi was deposed in 1974. The lion is still on Ethiopian coins, paper bills, stamps, and t-shirts everywhere. In the Rastafarian belief, the Lion of Judah  as mentioned in the Book of Revelations represents Emperor Haile Selassi. Bob Marley’s song, “Iron Lion Zion” is therefore highly symbolic: the “Lion in Zion” is the Emporer Haile Selassi and Zion is Ethiopia, the Rastafarian homeland. You see, Ethiopia is the only African country never to be colonized. The Rastafarians found this particularly inspiring and believe Haile Selassi  is the messiah from the Bible, God incarnate. In Jamaica in the 1930’s, the Jamacians looked upon him and his country as the ones who would bring peace, happiness, and prosperity. Haile Selassi was actually born with the name “Tafari”, and “Ras” means head (like king). When he became emperor his name naturally became Ras Tafari. Sound familiar? His name Haile Selassi was given to him at his infant baptism; all Ethiopians have two names, one in Ge’ez and one given to them at their baptism. So, there you have it. Next time you crank up some Bob Marley, or any reggae for that matter, listen for lines that reference Ethiopian history – the roots of the Rastafarian movement. Fascinating stuff!

So, Gondar is the site of a UNESCO World Heritage Site. King Fasilidas built a massive castle complex that was added to and built upon from the early 1600’s through the late 1700’s. There are over twenty palaces and royal buildings and thirty churches within the area.

IMG_5037

First we went to King Fasilidas royal baths.  This was outside the city, and the king used it as his weekend getaway.  Look at those magnificent trees!

IMG_5042

We couldn’t get over these trees.

IMG_5048

Here is Sean at the royal baths outside the city. The area is now used for Timkat, or Epiphany to commemorate Jesus’ baptism in the River of Jordan. They fill the baths up with water during Epiphany, and thousands of people come from around the country, and the world, to have their religious vows renewed. IMG_5053

One of the guard walls around the royal baths, and more great trees.IMG_5067

The sign at the entrance to the baths. Notice the Amharic script at the top, this is the language of Ethiopia. I’m not quite sure what it means by “Ethio-Norwegian Project”, but everything was really well restored and in great condition!

IMG_5085

The next place we went to was Emporer Fasilidas’ Castle Complex (known mainly as Fasil Ghebbi). It is a UNESCO World Heritage site. When we arrived, it was difficult to not pretend we were in Camelot! There were over twenty castles that we could wander in and out of. We clambered up and down the staircases, gave mock speeches from the balconies, and held imaginary feasts in the banquet halls. It was really, really unique. We felt like we were in another time! They were all built between the 17th and 18th centuries, and you can see nuances of Nubain, Arab, and Baroque styles.

IMG_5092

Here I am in front of Emporer Fasilidas’ library, or archive. This was my favorite building of the complex; I couldn’t help remembering The Name of The Rose, a fascinating novel by Umberto Eco about murders at a monastery. (It was later made into a film starring Sean Connery. Both the film and the novel are exceptional!)

IMG_5108

Another photo of me in front of the archive. Look at that great tower! Can’t you imagine someone flipping through yellowed pages by candlelight, contemplating the meaning of life?

IMG_5089

The view from a castle balcony. It was amazing you could climb around the place!

IMG_5150

After all that exploring, it was time to take a break. What to have? Beyaynetu, of course.

IMG_5159

The place we had lunch was an Ethiopian cultural restaurant. We listened to traditional music and watched fresh coffee being roasted. The two people above are, of course, in traditional dress. Looking back, I wish I had gotten a dress like that for myself!

IMG_5186

After lunch we visited Debre Berhan Selassie church. Built by Emporer Iyasu II in the 17th century, it is one of the most religiously significant churches in Ethiopia. It is one of few churches that has remained untouched (or unsacked) since it’s origin. All of the artwork on the inside is original. The paintings stretched from floor to ceiling. It was really spectacular.

IMG_5175

Demiss, our driver, is a deacon, so he was showing us how the drumming works during chanting. He really was a fount of knowledge!


IMG_5190

The most famous part of Debre Berhan Selassie is the ceiling. There are hundreds of angels painted on the ceiling, it is really a sight to behold.

IMG_5215

After we left the church, Abby and Kyle went back to the b&b to relax, but Sean and I were dying to get some evening photography done at the castle complex. When we got there, around 6pm, the lighting was amazing. Here is Sean, king of the castle!

IMG_5208

We had the whole place to ourselves. It was magical!

IMG_5294

We kicked off our evening at the Dashen brewery. All of the Dashen beer that is brewed for Ethiopia is crafted at the Dashen brewery in Gonder. It was the freshest beer I’ve tasted in years! Check out the 3 liter “beer tube”—we certainly had our fill of good drinks, good laughs, and great conversation. Demiss, our driver, is in the black t-shirt. The other guy is a friend of ours, his name is Melaku. We met him through Demiss and he helped us arrange a few of the tours we did on our trip. He was so fun to talk to! That is a night that will remain in my memory for a long time.

IMG_5295

After Gonder we made our way up to the Simien Mountains, the culminating activity of our trip. The Simien Mountains are also a UNESCO World Heritage site, and I had seen jaw-dropping photos of them before we arrived. We were not disappointed!

They are at an incredibly high elevation; the tallest peak, Ras Dashen, is at 13,650 feet! We had to be careful with the altitude, too. We were doing a lot of hiking and didn’t want to get sick. Unfortunately, after summitting two mountains and hiking fourteen hours in two days, the elevation caught up to Sean and he had a rough night. More on that later, though. For now, check out these fantastic baboons!

IMG_5302

Here I am at the beginning of our first hike. We did a two-night backpacking trip; the first day we set out from Sankaber camp and hiked to Geech (Gitch). The second day we hiked from Geech to Chennek, summitting Imet Gogo and Inatye along the way. The mountains were formed by volcanic activity and years of erosion. All of our hiking was over 12,000 feet elevation. Don’t worry, I doused myself in sunscreen and wore my scarf as a head-covering most of the trip!

IMG_5323

Trekking through the lush countryside…

IMG_5332

A community of Gelada Baboons.

IMG_5366

Great views as the sun got lower in the sky… Our first day’s hike was difficult as we shot up to 10,000 feet and hiked for six hours. Our total elevation gain for this day was 1,200′ as the Gitch campsite was at 10,800′.

IMG_5372

Heading across the hills on the way to our campsite.

IMG_5385

Rest stop near some pools. The trail mix we packed was manna to our growling stomachs!

IMG_5391

Even though it’s over 10,000 feet and in a national park, the hillsides are dotted with villages here and there. It was a surreal experience to be trekking in the “wilderness” and the come upon people going about their daily lives!

IMG_5401

As we arrived at our campsite, the sun was just perfect. I fell in love with these gorgeous trees.

IMG_5410

Okay, I have to confess. It wasn’t true “backpacking”. We hired a chef, a guide, a scout, and mules to bring our things to the camp. All we hiked with were day packs. We never saw the mules, I think they took another trail to get to the camps. It was such a luxury to huddle up with fresh roasted coffee and fresh popped popcorn (an Ethiopian tradition) after a long day of hiking! The “hut” I am in is a steel-sided hut the park service erects for campers. Demiss even came along! He drove the van as far as he could and then hiked another route to get to the campsite. We really loved hanging out with him. Did I mention I miss him? 🙂

IMG_5425

Our first course of the meal, homemade soup.

IMG_5429

A candlelit dinner, a roaring fire, what more could you ask for? I don’t want to hike any other way again!

IMG_5430

Our chef found out that Abby and I were addicted to injera and shuro, so in ADDITION to spaghetti, soup, and vegetables he also made Ethiopian food! We were beyond stuffed. All of these delicacies so high up in the mountains!

There you have it, folks. All of the photos in this post were taken in the course of two days. Can you believe it?

Next time I will post our two summits in the mountains, the rest of our trekking adventure, and our play-date with baboons.

(P.S. Ethiopian airlines has direct flights from many corners of the globe, and has great rates!)

See you next time, and as they say in Amharic, “amasaganalo” for reading my blog!

Categories: Ethiopia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Ethiopia: Iron Like A Lion In Zion

I need to confess: I’ve been keeping a secret from you. You had to have been wondering about our spring break, right? We’re at an American school, we had a spring break last year, and we’ve been burning the midnight oil since January.

We had a spring break. What a spring break we had.

We went to Ethiopia.

I didn’t tell you because I didn’t want to build any anticipation. Some people don’t like excess anticipation, and we had the trip planned for months. Ethiopia doesn’t have as much background knowledge with people, and I thought it would be a nice surprise : )

Now that we’ve returned from our trip, I can boldly say that I have gone where no Wisconsin-Middle-School-Teacher-Working-In-Kuwait has gone before. We booked the flights in early November, and had months of scouring the internet, staring slaw-jawed at pictures of baboons, castles, mountains, and waterfalls.

Why Ethiopia, you ask? It all started one lackluster evening in Kuwait; I had finished my lesson plans for the following day, swallowed my hummus, sipped my tea, watched my episodes, and reclined on the couch, nibbling on baklava, staring at a map of the world. (Yes, this series of events is a frequent occurrence in my life. Admire or pity me, your choice.) I noticed that Ethiopia was considerably closer than I had originally thought, and that there was a patchwork of national parks and mountain ranges. I called up my girlfriend Abby, and an hour later we booked our tickets.

We couldn’t have made a better choice.

I don’t know how to describe Ethiopia, it was unlike anywhere we’ve ever been.

Ethiopia was…

Camelot
Baboons
One of the largest mountain ranges in Africa
Giant smiles and waving hands
Platters of delicious food, meant to be lovingly shared with friends
Rastafarian history
Foosball
Beautiful women
Great music
Pure, simple life and love.

We hired a driver, and are so glad we did. His name is Demiss Mamo, and really felt more like a good friend than a business. We spent all our meals with him, hiked with him, laughed with him, told stories with him, and learned more about Ethiopia with him than we ever could have alone. Demiss was the best driver I’ve ever had, and actually miss him quite a bit. He is a unique soul. Check out his website at http://www.ethiopiandriver.com  – he’s even driven for Reuters, BBC, and Oxfam.

Shall we get to the first round of photos?

IMG_4834

Snapped out of the car window as we drove from the capital city, Addis Ababa, up to Bahir Dar on Lake Tana. A simple home, a bit nicer than most we saw in the countryside. I can’t believe the hardened mud walls hold up so well, even through the rain.

IMG_4836

Our first stop was at an overlook to the Jemma River Gorge. We had a coffee (Ethiopian coffee, mind you! More on that later…) at a lodge that was perched right on the cliff; it was really beautiful.

IMG_4843

Our friends Kyle and Abby overlooking the gorge. We have grown really close with them this year, and had a blast with them in Ethiopia. They are a couple that we would love to stay in touch with forever; hopefully we can find space in our new school in Cambodia for them…

IMG_4847

The Jemma River is a tributary to the Nile. The gorge is over 1,000 meters deep. The weather was just perfect, and the coffee tasted just right. Paradise.

IMG_4850

After our coffee, we began a short hike along the rim of the gorge. There were Gelada Baboons everywhere! We were terrified at first, but our driver laughed and told us they are harmless.

IMG_4867

Our hike took us to the Portuguese Bridge, built in the 16th century by the Portuguese. It is still used as a traveling route on market days. They say it was constructed out of limestone and ostrich eggs!

IMG_4879

After our diversion in the Jemma Valley, we continued driving North towards our destination, Bahir Dar. I shot the above photo out of the van; like I said, our driver was fantastic! We had a van to ourselves, it was so relaxing and great to be able to spread out. We felt so safe the whole time, and it was so nice to have someone who knew all the directions and the good places to stop and eat.

In the above photo, you may notice the yellow water jugs. We saw them everywhere; it was really humbling to realize that people walk miles each day to get to their water source. They then walk an hour or farther back to their home, only to carefully and meticulously ration the water they’ve transported. And here we are in Kuwait (or America) taking twenty-minute showers. It made me really disappointed in how carelessly we use water in a large part of the world. How easy our lives are, and how mindlessly we are able to live.

IMG_4900

From the Jemma Valley we continued north and eventually reached the Blue Nile Gorge. The magnitude of this gorge is inconceivable. I had to find some statistics online after returning, just so that I could conceptualize how large it actually is:

The Blue Nile gorge is 250 miles long.
The Grand Canyon in America is 277 miles long.

The Blue Nile gorge is 1,500m deep, that’s 4,921 feet deep! (If that doesn’t make sense to you, I’ll say that from the top of the gorge to the bottom is almost 5,000 feet. Or that the walls of the gorge rise 5,000 feet from the bottom of the canyon.)
The Grand Canyon is 1,800m deep, or 6,000 feet deep.

As you can see, they’re comparable in size. We visited the Grand Canyon of Africa. Pretty cool, huh?

IMG_4905

The Blue Nile River at the base of the Blue Nile Gorge. (Those cliff walls are the first in a series of steps of walls; it is far to vast to capture in a single photograph!)

IMG_4913

We stopped in a town called Debre Markos for lunch, and Abby and I discovered the most delicious meal on the face of the earth: Beyaynetu. Beyaynetu is an Ethiopian staple food, and is perfect for vegetarians like myself. It is served on injera, which is a sour pancake-like bread. You eat it with your fingers, using the bread as your serving utensil. You pull off a piece of injera, scoop up some lentils/veggies/shiro of your choice, and pop it in your mouth.The whole time we were in Ethiopia Abby and I split beyaynetu, as it was massive each time we ordered it! Needless to say, we ate beyaynetu for every meal.


IMG_5025

Another meal of beyaynetu on our trip, complete with local Ethiopian beer. I particularly liked the hot green paper, stuffed with minced onions. Every different item on the injera had it’s own unique flavor and texture. We absolutely devoured it. You will see many more photos of food before I finish talking about Ethiopia…

IMG_5021

A fascinating rock sculpture called the Devil’s Nose.

IMG_5011

Sean and I passed many hours in the van playing cribbage.

IMG_5007

A selection of Ethiopian beer (and Kyle very excited in the background). I particularly liked the Dashen beer, on the far left. Sean preferred St. George. Everyone liked Bedele. Okay, after two years in Kuwait we love any beer.
IMG_4999

We spent an afternoon relaxing on the shores of Lake Tana, the source of the Blue Nile. It was so lush and green!

IMG_4998

Here’s another food picture, this time an action shot of Abby and I eating injera. This meal, however, is not beyaynetu, but something called shiro. Shiro is made from powdered chickpeas or broadbeans. We would sometimes order a whole platter of shiro and injera, as seen above. Yum!

???????????????????????????????

The Blue Nile Falls.

IMG_4981

Sean and I at the Blue Nile Falls.

IMG_4967

Hiking to the Blue Nile Falls, I just had to capture this quintessential African tree…

IMG_4947

Abby, Kyle, and I waiting for Sean on a bridge near the Blue Nile Falls. It was market day so everyone was taking their animals to the market near Bahir Dar.

IMG_4940

A crowded bridge (foot traffic only) on the way to the Blue Nile Falls.

IMG_5028

After the Blue Nile Falls we stayed in a gorgeous bed and breakfast called the Lodge Du Chateau in Gonder (Gondar). It had a beautiful terrace overlooking the mountains. We spent many hours playing cards and sipping coffee up there. Paradise.

IMG_4916

Storytelling and recapping the day at our hotel in Bahir Dar.

IMG_4926

The first night, in Bahir Dar, we stayed at a place called “B & B The Annex”, which felt most like a homestay to me. We woke early in the morning to symphony of birds dancing through the trees. Sean was reading his book, sipping fresh mango juice, and I was giving serious thanks for this gorgeous life we live.

That wraps up the first two days of our trip in Ethiopia! Stay tuned for photos of what has been called the “Camelot” of Africa, the Simien Mountains, baboons, and much more!

Categories: Ethiopia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.