Posts Tagged With: weekend

Long weekend in Phuket

Monday is a national holiday, so Sean and I have been enjoying a three-day weekend together. Contrary to what we expected, we actually spend very little time at the beach here on the island! Take a look at a few snapshots from this weekend to see how we generally relax. (Hint: It largely revolves around food and the dog!)

It hasn’t quite felt like Christmas season even though it’s only three weeks away. That changed when our friend Amanda threw a lovely Christmas party on Friday night. We put on our red shirts, brought some egg nog, and had fun dancing the night away!

Saturday marked a recent trend in Sean’s hobbies which is attending our local ukulele group. It’s held at Anthem Wakepark and a few teachers along with other friends get together and play music. I’m working on learning the cajón but end up playing with the dogs! They’re doing Christmas music next week so I think I’ll be a vocalist.

While it’s not going to win any photography contests, this picture from out the car window as we drove home Saturday night was too good not to post. Half of Phuket feels like a tourist hub, but the backroads, oh the glorious backroads! Just a few water buffalos, storks, and palm trees….

Dinner on Saturday night was at Kruvit Raft House. We’d driven past hundreds of times but never thought to try it out. The restaurant is situated around a small lake and half of it is floating on the lake itself. We chose a bamboo hut and ordered fried rice with crab and mango salad. There were massive chunks of crab which was really surprising. I’d definitely go back!

Sunday morning was pretty rainy, so we didn’t leave the house until noon. We found a noodle shop on our way to the park that was absolutely packed with people. The dry noodle dish in the foreground was my favorite; while I couldn’t identify everything in the bowl, that didn’t stop me from slurping it down!

After filling our bellies, we headed to King Rama IX park. It’s a pretty large park in the center of the island with plenty of paths for walking. Summit liked the dinosaurs. 

With the end of the rainy season finally here I think we’ll be spending more time at the beach. But honestly, I really love the side of Phuket we’ve explored so far!

Categories: Misc | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Kep & Kampot Off The Beaten Path (AKA, What else you can do besides eating crab.)

When most people visit Kep and Kampot, they beeline it to the coast and spend the afternoon sinking their teeth into succulent seafood and reading poolside. As the sun sinks into the horizon, they kick back with a cocktail and plan their next destination of either Sihanoukville, Vietnam, or Phnom Penh. I am the first person to admit that many of my weekends in Kep look like this, but it must be said that there is SO much more.

You could easily kill a week in Kep and Kampot and never do the same thing twice. (Although you might want to.) Back in October, Sean and I spent all of the Pchum Ben holiday along the coast. While we have our local favorite activities, we knew there were a few hidden gems that we had to visit. With a tank full of gas and a map in our hands, we set out to look for all that Kep and Kampot have to offer.

Some of our favorites? The caves. We had no idea there were caves in Cambodia! Not to mention, Phnom Chhnork cave has a 7th century temple inside of it. Another favorite was bicycling along the pepper plantations, home to the famous Kampot pepper. Rabbit island was also a pleasant surprise; a tropical getaway just off the coast of Kep.

I drew up a map to give you a feeling of the area. The red line is the route we drove on our trip last October. I recommend driving this way as it makes a nice loop for the drive to/from Phnom Penh. The limestone hills on both routes are stunning, and you can see them from two different perspectives.

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Also, you’ve got to check out the video Sean made as a mash-up of our trip. Hopefully it will convince you to spend more than a weekend in Kep!

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Dumpling Street: The Legend of the Penh


 

The dumpling.

A warm, steaming ball of glutinous goodness. A crispy, flaky packet of love. Globally, there are as many styles of dumpling as there are version of “Insert Country Name” Idol. (No, really. Look how many countries have their own Idol show.)

America has chicken  and dumplings. Italy has ravioli. India has the samosa. Poland has the pierogi. Japan has gyoza. Crab rangoons. Gnocchi. It’s hard to find a cuisine that DOESN’T have a dumpling.

In Cambodia, one street that has become something of a legend when it comes to all things dumpling. Street 136, adjacent to the bus stop near Central Market, has been serving up the most delicious dumplings I have found in the city yet.

But maybe that’s only because there are five dumpling restaurants in a row. Five. How could one go out for dumplings and stop after just one?

Enter the dumpling crawl.

I first heard of the dumpling crawl on Move To Cambodia’s site a few months ago. Since then I have been itching to head to street 136 and try things out for myself.

IMG_1861Our first stop was Feng Yuan Restaurant, closest to Central Market on 136. If you couldn’t guess, everything was in Chinese the second we walked in the door. Even the staff spoke Chinese before Khmer, it took a few minutes of pantomiming to clarify our order!

 

IMG_1860I knew we were in for a treat when I saw heavily-used steaming baskets  outside the entrance.

 

IMG_1862Not only that, but seaweed swaying in the breeze! On a drying rack, as if it were laundry, they were drying kelp. My friends Jeff and Lily were great models for all my photos. (How much Chinese can you see behind the seaweed? See what I mean?)

 

IMG_1859It wasn’t hard to warm up to the idea of the dumpling crawl. Restaurant #1 had us off to a great start.

 

IMG_1863As we moved onto the next restaurant, we found a very confusing poster. The thing is, I don’t know it is yelling at me, or if it is giving me wisdom?

 

IMG_1864I’m not so sure about the “Mind no evil” monkey…

 

IMG_1865Regardless of their ambiguous poster, this place had by far and away, the best dumplings. Totally crispy, flavorful, and succulent.

 

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Restaurant #3’s dumplings were a bit of a disappointment. The bright side was that they had an entire cup of minced garlic for us to drown our tasteless bites in. Not only that, but each of these places had out-of-this-world chili oil. I don’t know if this is how the oil is made here in Cambodia, but this website has pretty nice photos of the possible process.

 

 

IMG_1868Now, restaurant #4, on the other hand, had it’s own unique theme going on. Not only were their dumplings pretty top notch, but they had a complementary picked vegetable platter in addition to the chili oil, minced garlic, and hot peppers. Their dumplings weren’t have bad either.

 

IMG_1869By the end of our dumpling crawl, we had feasted at four different restaurants, learned a lot about the dumpling culture in Phnom Penh, and played lots and lots of cards.

The worst part? Now, I can’t stop dreaming about dumplings. I thirst for them almost as badly as I do for coffee in the morning. I seek out any opportunity to overwhelm my tastebuds with dumpling goodness.

The moral of the story: Dumplings are a slippery slope of indulgence. Eat with caution. Or, throw off the bowlines and drown yourself on street 136.

 

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Saturday At Central Market

I have a confession.

I may pride myself on the upkeep of Angkor’s Away, but I actually have  a silent partner. I write the words, I frame the posts, I generate the ideas… but I take none of the photos.

You can pretty much count on Sean as the photographer for Angkor’s Away. Almost all of the time. Without him, this blog would be imageless stories.

Now that you have some background, I can tell you a story. Since we got the GoPro, we have barely taken any pictures. The GoPro captures such amazing video footage, that I bring it everywhere. It’s a weird transition—I used to carry a camera and snap photos as we went about our day. But with the GoPro, you turn it on, hold it in your hand, and pretty much forget about it. Then, we look back through the footage and take screen shots of the pictures we like the most.

We just finished up our first school year here in Cambodia. We have officially lived in Phnom Penh for eleven months. So, the weekend before we left, I headed up to Central Market, with the goal to take some photos of my own.

DCIM101GOPROThe corner of Central Market. A cyclo driver cleaning his carriage, getting ready for a busy day.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.24.44 AMThe alleys near Central Market.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.23.20 AMA family ready to sit down to breakfast, and a woman going about her daily business.

DCIM101GOPROCentral Market. It was built in 1937, and was said to be the “largest market in Asia” at the time. It was designed in Art Deco style by French artist Louis Chauchon.

 

DCIM101GOPROOranges for sale. Our oranges are green here, but they still taste just as good!

 

DCIM101GOPROSkewers of __________, frying in oil, ready for sale.

 

DCIM101GOPROThese ladies were really cute. They were selling fresh honeycomb! Some even still had bees sitting on them. They didn’t want me to take their picture, they wanted me to buy their honey.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.18.50 AMA popular walk-way along Central Market.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.19.45 AMMangos, mangos, everywhere!

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.22.53 AMThe main dome of Central Market. Jewelry, sunglasses, and watches are in the central dome. It has a really cool feel.

 

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.25.44 AMDid I say we have a lot of mangos in Cambodia?

 

DCIM101GOPROAfter Central Market, I stopped by one of my favorite smoothie ladies on my way home. On the corner by the National Museum, “Davy’s Shake Shack” whips up some of the most delicious fruit smoothies I have had in a while. My favorite is passion fruit, mango, coconut.

Screen Shot 2014-05-31 at 8.16.57 AMAnd so I sat with my smoothie and took in the view. What a great way to end a trip to the hustling and bustling Central Market.

 

And that’s it! Year #1 in Cambodia is finished! I didn’t want to say this, but I am actually sitting in Seoul Airport as I type this. The year is really over. But, don’t worry, this is still so much to see! I have another amazing video to show you from our explorations in Thailand, and there is also the undiscovered wilds of Wisconsin… and probably some photos of cheese curds and good beer. If it isn’t consumed too quickly.

 

Check back soon!

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Kim And Sean’s Big Adventure To The Coast: Part One

I have been chomping at the bit to share our most recent adventure with you. As teachers, we work the basic 9-5 (or more like 6-5) job, Monday through Friday. When the weekend rolls around, we’re normally too knackered (a word I’ve adopted from our Kiwi friends here) to do anything but lay around the pool and catch up with our friends. When we got our first three-day weekend, we were set on venturing out of the city. I love Phnom Penh, it’s awesome, but there is so much more of Cambodia to see.

In Kuwait, there was Kuwait City, and that was pretty much it. I never felt like I was cheating myself on the weekends because I was doing all that there was to do, and I was loving it. Here, there is so much vast, untrammeled beautiful places, that they whisper to me in my sleep, taunting me.

When we accepted this job, I began to Google and fall in love with the Cardamom mountains.

We were planning on catching a bus to the coast, but our friends offered us a ride in their car to head out into the mountains to a lodge on the coast. (Yes, you can do both “mountains” and “coast” in one weekend!)

So, we all packed into their Mitsubishi Pajero and headed to Koh Kong.

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It’s a four-and-a-half hour drive, and really got stunningly beautiful about halfway through. If you look at the map above, you can see all of the environmentally-protected areas. I never knew Cambodia had so many reserves and parks myself until we got here.

The most popular part of the coast is Sihanoukville, which is near Ream National Park on the above map. To get to Sihanoukville it’s about a two and a half hour drive. The Cardamom Mountains, where we were going, take up the left-hand side of the country along the Thai border. Koh Kong is a small town along the border, and the lodge we were staying in was a twenty-minute drive inland. We were meeting another couple there, who also work at the school.

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Our friends Chino and Anna have a lovely puppy named Kampot. I am kind of falling in love with him and his goofiness.

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Cambodian countryside.

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We took a bathroom break on the long drive at a small roadside cafe. I love Cambodia’s calico sky.

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We found a new litter of puppies at the cafe. They were such cute little things! I want to get a dog so badly, but know it would be tough on both us and the doggy due to all the travel we do. I think I’ll just offer to babysit Kampot as much as possible!

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As we rolled into the Koh Kong area, Chino and Anna pulled off the road and told us we would be able to spot the lodge in the forest. I was confused about what they meant, but, lo and behold, we saw the teeny bungalows peeking out of the wilderness! You can only access the lodge by boat, but I will talk more about our arrival later…

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The pull out where we spotted the lodge. We are loving Cambodia.

Before we headed up the river to the lodge, we decided to get lunch. We had been driving since 8am, and it was around noon. We drove up to the coast and took a dirt road along one of the tributary rivers to a place called the “Crab Chack” (… or “shack” to us Western landlubbers). We had heard about how divine the seafood along the coast was, but I truly had no conception of what we were about to experience.

IMG_6716The Crab Shack was a little hideaway on the coast with hammocks, tables, and a few tourists sipping beer alongside the locals.

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You could walk along the beach, where Anna and Sasha looked at the beach glass. I was on a sensory overload. I didn’t know where to turn or what to do, it was all too much to soak in. I kept telling Anna and Sasha that I felt like I was on some tropical vacation that I would have to leave in a week and never see again, but then realized that I will be living here… for quite a while.

Then the food came.

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And what a feast it was. Anna told us to order the prawns with garlic. Each plate was heaped with the largest prawns I had ever seen. You would then create a dip made of fresh crushed Cambodian pepper and squeezed lime. The pot at the top of the photo held rice, which made it a symphony of flavors and textures in your mouth.

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I had never had such prawns in my life. They were so meaty, it was mouthfuls of shrimp. Never before in my life did I ever think I’d say, “Wow, that was a delicious mouthful of meaty, tender, juicy shrimp.” No tartar sauce needed here, folks.

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While we were eating, Sean spotted quite a beastly arachnid above our table.

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Here he tried to take another picture of the spider, but instead got a great shot of the atmosphere and mood of our lunch. Love the guy in the back.

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I was sad to leave the Crab Shack, but know that we will be back.


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Then it was time to head to the lodge… but this step of the journey must wait for another day. As it was our first ‘big journey’ out of the city, we took 300 pictures in 3 days. We were a little out of control. Instead of cramming all the pictures into one long post about the weekend as a whole, I thought you’d enjoy shorter, more focused posts to keep it interesting and palatable.

Check back in a few days to see where this boat takes us!

Categories: Cambodia | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

“His car exploded. The man must have had bad luck with money.”

Today’s tales are for the adventurer in you. Kuwait, this tame country of shopping malls and family picnics, has burst out of it’s hum-drum shell to offer me quite the blogging treat this month.

Two, seemingly-to-be-average, trips into Kuwait City and Salmiya ended up showcasing crowds of people with wide eyes and slack jaws. One was for a festival held in the street, and one was for an exploded car.

That’s right. A car exploded. Don’t ask me how. Let’s start at the beginning…

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My friends and I board the public bus to get to the Old Souk (Mubarakiya) in Kuwait City. When the buses are crowded we sit in the “Ladies Seats.” When I ride the bus alone (which is often, it’s really safe!), I also sit in the ladies seats. They’re the six or so seats up near the bus driver. If you ever board the bus and it’s over-crowded, men will stand and ensure the ladies get their “Ladies Seats”. To be honest, it’s pleasantly convenient to know I’ve got a nice spot to watch traffic : )

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When we arrived at the souk, we stuffed our faces at our favorite restaurant. What a feast it was! We dined on hummus, salad, rice, chicken, pomegranate and cucumbers, beans, and endless flat bread. It was delectable.

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After dinner, as usual, we strolled past the shops selling all sorts of sweets and treats. This guy was making Nutella pastries. I had to take a picture of the menu to believe it.


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If you look at the last item on the menu, “Pie nutella chocolate” is where it’s at. For just the equivalent of $5, you get a 10″ pizza-sized pastry baked in an oven and filled with Nutella. Pair that fact with the lack of sidewalks in Kuwait and you’ve got a recipe for a heart attack.


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Ahhhhh, the strange items at the souk. Portable sauna, anyone? I think you sit inside and your head pops out the top. “Deep cleansing of the body through perspiration”. Yum.

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This was where our night took a strange turn. We left the souk with the intent to wander the surrounding area, when we came across caution tape and a crowd of people. We nervously inched closer and saw they were all gawking at a car in the middle of the parking lot. Not just any car, a torched car.

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A car that had completely exploded. Everything inside it was torched. Never to be repaired. Ready for the landfill.

We had absolutely no idea how this happened, so I asked the nearest guy standing next to me. The guy spins quite the yarn saying, “Well, his car exploded, and there was 20,000 KD inside of it.”

Stop right there.

20,000 KD is $70,000 USD. The man’s car spontaneously combusts and he has seventy grand inside? Yeah, right.

No, the man insists, “His car exploded. The man must have had bad luck with money.”

And that was it. Everyone was standing around, looking like, “Eh, an exploded car. Weird, but not too weird. Unlucky man.” They continued to tell me that the car caught on fire and burnt with all the money inside of it.

What are the odds, that in the middle of a parking lot, a car just goes up in flames? Not only does it go up in flames, but it continues to burn to complete, melted, irreparable cinders? NOT ONLY does it become decimated, but it does so with $70,000 inside of it?

I smell something fishy in the Persian Gulf.

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Since this date I have been scouring the internet for any follow up news article, and haven’t found a single one. This was, hands down, one of the strangest things I’d ever seen in my two years in Kuwait.

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Regardless, we soldiered on through the souk, and Abby and Kyle popped into a perfumery to contemplate some fine scents.

Thus concludes the evening of the exploding car. Not to leave a sour taste in your mouth, I thought I’d finish with a cute story of a street festival I found a few days later. Everybody loves a carnival!

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It was a sunny Saturday afternoon, and I decided to take a walk. I just had to snap a picture of this… “Medical Laboratory” I found in Salmiya. Suffice to say, I didn’t stick around. They sure have different medical licensing issues here than in the States!


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When I got to the main shopping area, I was surprised to see the street completely blocked off. There were balloons, music, dancers, food, and happy families.

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Grimace even made a guest appearance!


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I took this picture not only to show the crowd, but to show you the conglomeration of restaurants on this street! They stretch on as far as the eye can see. (And if you can’t make it out, there’s a Dunkin’ Donuts right after the Subway.)

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As if the mascot Grimace wasn’t enough, McDonald’s even had their own break-dancers  It was a happenin’ place. These guys were pretty talented! I wish they danced like that while they made my McFlurries.

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At the Wisconsin State Fair we have corn on the cob, in Kuwait they have kebab stands.

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Just like every state fair in America, the police had a cautionary and informational booth. This guy was to demonstrate the dangers of alcohol consumption… (Remember, this is a dry country, so they take it pretty seriously…)

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I hung out with the police for a while and learned how they dust for fingerprints at a crime scene.


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I’m not a big missile person, so I didn’t ask any questions here. Maybe you weaponry buffs can identify some of them?

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Lastly, like every event in Kuwait. There are fancy cars. There are always fancy cars.

Overall, it was quite the eventful weekend. I sure had a lot to write home about!

I’ve got quite a few more blogs on Kuwait up my sleeve, so stay tuned!

Categories: Kuwait | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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